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URBAN AGRICULTURE AS A LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
 
Sean Dunn, Alyssa Sinclair, Shelley Stevens
  This research analyzes the effectiveness of urban agriculture as a tool for economic development. We focus on defining and describing the rationale for urban agriculture as it relates to sustainable and local economic development. We discuss the social, economic, and development implications from the current literature and examine case studies to determine strategies and methods for implementation.
 
LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLANNING FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS
 
Zach Adriaenssens, Travis Horsley, Richard Kolenda, Evan D. Robertson
  Worker Dislocation is a persistent negative force that erodes the local economy over a long period of time. The initial disinvestment of the firm certainly has negative psychological and monetary impacts. However, dislocation also causes a decrease in workersĄŻ lifetime earnings; increases incidents of domestic violence, depression and other psychological responses to stress; and can cause an increase in the foreclosure rate which depresses property values within the locality. Together these forces put the locality in a challenging situation, with rising demand for public services and falling municipal revenue to provide those services.
 
WASTE-TO-PROFIT NETWORK AS A SUSTAINABLE LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
 
Briana Sell, Brooks Smith, Nathanael Hoelzel
  The central thesis of this research is that local Waste-to-Profit Networks are viable strategies for promoting sustainable local economic development. Waste-to-Profit Networks formalize the exchange and utilization of waste and by-products among firms. Historically, as it is today, using cheaper substitutes for raw materials and generating revenue from waste materials as opposed to paying for disposal are good business practices. What has changed, though, is the acknowledgement that waste exchanges can also translate into community and environmental benefits. The focus is on Waste-to-Profit Networks, but much of the supporting evidence was derived from the more robust literature collection of eco-industrial parks. This is an appropriate methodology because there are enough similarities in the concepts and practices of developing and operating both eco-industrial parks and Waste-to-Profit Networks. This report includes a summary of the concept and trends of Waste-to-Profit Networks. It then continues with a discussion of stakeholders, benefits, and regulatory issues. The conclusion introduces (3) case studies selected to provide context in exploring Waste-to-Profit Networks as possible models for advancing the concept in Atlanta and Georgia.